Teaching

Legislative Politics: Understanding Strategic Interaction in Law-Making

Semester: 

Winter

Offered: 

2019
Laws are one of the main outputs of politics. In order to understand why some laws come into being, and in which shape, one has to understand the processes of legislative politics. We will analyse the role of parliaments, parliamentary committees, governments, parties as well as other actors such as courts or interest groups in legislative politics. The main focus of this class is an analytical perspective highlighting the strategic interactions involved in legislative decision-making. 

Public Choice

Semester: 

Winter

Offered: 

2019
Public Choice is the study of political phenomena using tools of economics. In this course, we will provide an introduction to the use of decision and game theoretic approaches to the analysis of aggregating preferences, voting, party competition, political bargaining and decision-making, and lobbying. Main emphasis is on theoretical aspects of public choice to help understand how institutions constrain and incentivize political actors.

Interest Group Politics

Semester: 

Summer

Offered: 

2019
In the media, Lobbyists are often portrayed as an evil force only concerned with filling their pockets at the expense of the public. In the academic literature, interest groups are seen as an important factor in decision-making processes in modern democracies. In this seminar we will analyze the role of interest groups in shaping policy outcomes. This includes the analysis of lobbying activities and strategies, as well as the assessment of interest group efficacy. We seek to provide a balanced view of the risks and benefits of interest group involvement.

Political Economy

Semester: 

Summer

Offered: 

2019

In this class, we will discuss selected Topics in Political Economy. The course is structured by discussing theoretical models on a topic, followed by a discussion and application of methods to empirically test the models. We will cover topics such as fiscal policy and the budget, electoral competition and political accountability, corruption, and lobbying. Strong emphasis is put on the research process and reproducibility. We will discuss approaches and tools to ensure that research output reproducible. Students will learn how to use R, Rstudio and knitr/RMarkdown. We will also...

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Legislative Politics: Understanding Strategic Interaction in Law-Making

Semester: 

Winter

Offered: 

2018
Laws are one of the main outputs of politics. In order to understand why some laws come into being, and in which shape, one has to understand the processes of legislative politics. We will analyse the role of parliaments, parliamentary committees, governments, parties as well as other actors such as courts or interest groups in legislative politics. The main focus of this class is an analytical  perspective highlighting the strategic interactions involved in legislative decision-making.

Public Choice

Semester: 

Winter

Offered: 

2018
Public Choice is the study of political phenomena using tools of economics. In this course, we will provide an introduction to the use of decision and game theoretic approaches to the analysis of aggregating preferences, voting, party competition, political bargaining and decision-making, lobbying. Main emphasis is on theoretical aspects of public choice to help understand how institutions constrain and incentivize political actors.

Experiments in the Social Sciences

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2018
Experiments are an increasingly popular research method in the Social Sciences. At the same time, experiments are rapidly becoming the most important tool used for policy evaluation by national decision-makers and international organizations such as the World Bank. This is due to the fact that experiments are often seen as a gold standard for research designs because they allow for causal inferences. In this course, we will discuss different types of experiments and how they can be used to study causal relationships. We will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of... Read more about Experiments in the Social Sciences

Legislative Politics: Understanding Strategic Interaction in Law-Making

Semester: 

Winter

Offered: 

2017
Laws are one of the main outputs of politics. In order to understand why some laws come into being, and in which shape, one has to understand the processes of legislative politics. We will analyse the role of parliaments, parliamentary committees, governments, parties as well as other actors such as courts or interest groups in legislative politics. The main focus of this class is an analytical perspective highlighting the strategic interactions involved in legislative decision-making.

Political Institutions: Analysis and Comparison

Semester: 

Winter

Offered: 

2017
Institutions are a key unit of analysis in comparative politics. In this class we will discuss different theoretical approaches used to understand political institutions. The focus will be on emergence, stability and institutional change. We will also highlight differences and commonalities between democratic and autocratic institutions. A main focus is on how institutions help shape political behaviour and outcomes.

Interest Group Politics

Semester: 

Summer

Offered: 

2017
In the media, Lobbyists are often portrayed as an evil force only concerned with filling their pockets at the expense of the public. In the academic literature, interest groups are seen as an important factor in decision-making processes in modern democracies. In this  seminar we will analyze the role of interest groups in shaping policy outcomes. This includes the analysis of lobbying activities and strategies, as well as the assessment of interest group efficacy. We seek to provide a balanced view of the risks and benefits of interest group involvement.

Experimental Political Science

Semester: 

Summer

Offered: 

2017
Experiments are an increasingly popular research method in political science. They are often seen as the gold standard for research designs. In this course we will discuss different types of experiments and how they can be used to study causal relationships in political science. We will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of different experimental designs. The design of the course hinges on a connection of theoretical discussions and a strong active component, where students design, run, analyse and present an experiment in group work.

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